Dementia in the news. Check out my Brain

Dementia in the news. Check out my Brain and Cognition page for loads of tips and resources: http://ow.ly/rH8bP

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Dementia in the news. Check out my Brain

  1. Mayall Joanne (PENNINE CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST)

    Hi I have read your information on anxiety, would the supplements be suitable for my 11 year old daughter who is suffering from anxiety?

    Joanne

    ________________________________

    • It depends, some of them. Why don’t you give me a bit more info – email me if you prefer or use the FB group – and I will advise the best way forward. Generally speaking, fish oils and a good multi for her age should help. Has she just had a growth spurt, has she got white spots on her nails, when does it happen, is it new?

      Generally, I like MindLinx Powder with extra Bs and the Omega Berry liquid as a good supportive combination.

    • Hi Micki, I wonder if any of your followers has a view on this. My Urology Consultant tells me there is no food or additive I can take to reduce or slow down the growth of my PSA. Regards ken

      • Just because he doesn’t know about it Ken, doesn’t mean the evidence isn’t there! There is good research about but always need more, of course. You only have to put ‘prostate’ into the searchbox on here to find several studies. And selenium is particularly strong evidentially, for example:

        “Selenium is a trace mineral found in soil, water, and some foods. It is an essential element in several metabolic pathways. There is some evidence that low selenium levels are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. In human studies, initial evidence has suggested that selenium supplementation reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer in men with normal baseline PSA (prostate specific antigen) levels, and low selenium blood levels. Selenium deficiency may be diagnosed by measuring the selenium in the blood where the normal level is 70 nanograms per milliliter or ng/ml in blood plasma (liquid component) or 90 ng/ml in red blood cells, where the normal values are indicated. Laboratory studies have reported several potential mechanisms for selenium’s beneficial effects in prostate cancer prevention, including a decrease in androgen receptors and PSA production, angiogenesis (growth of new blood vessels in tumors) inhibition, and increased antioxidant effects including cancer cell apoptosis (cell death).”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s