Toiletries Contributing to #Diabetes Rise?

Following on from yesterday’s post showing the massive rise in diabetic prescriptions – up 50% in the last six years, I spied this report today in WDDTY:

Personal care products are unsuspected cause of diabetes

Personal care products could be an unsuspected cause of diabetes in women.  Chemicals in moisturizers, nail polish, soaps, hair sprays and perfumes increase the risk by up to 70 per cent.

The most dangerous chemicals are the phthalates, which have already been banned in the manufacture of  toys and  baby products across Europe and the US.  However, they are still permitted in personal care products and cosmetics.

Women with the highest levels of the chemical in their body doubled their risk of diabetes, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital discovered. They analysed the urine of 2,350 women, and found a direct link between phthalate levels and diabetes.  Women with higher than average levels had between a 60 and 70 per cent increased risk of diabetes, depending on the type of phthalate found.

(Source: Environmental Health Perspectives, 2012; doi: 10.1289/ehp.1104717).

Now, I’m not sure that making correlations like that study does is altogether reliable, but it does bring up the question of the changes that happen in our bodies as a result of the myriad environmental chemicals we ingest and slather on every day. Most of them, I’m sure, we can only guess at.

For someone who has been nagging on about toxic toiletries now for well over 20 years, I feel smug. And pretty pleased that there are so many alternatives around now as I am discovering as being a judge and commentator on the Skincare Freefrom Awards process. Check here for more on that and to find a fab list of companies to choose from as alternatives to the toxic majority on your High Street.

 

2 Replies to “Toiletries Contributing to #Diabetes Rise?”

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