New FreeFrom Products ‘Rolling News’

Time was when I had chance to tell you about new freefrom foods you might like to try. I don’t really have as much time for that now as I would like, but, thankfully, Cressida at Foodsmatter, has started a rolling news page for what’s new and looks good, and now I don’t have to worry🙂

The Gluten Free Kitchen So, if you want to know what new freefrom foods are hitting the shops – such as Tesco’s six new bakery products or Gluten Free Kitchen’s new tarts and crumbles now available in Waitrose – that’s where you’ll find out.

Go and take a peek and bookmark the page. Thanks Cressida, makes my life easier and suggests some new tasty ideas for us all!


The TGF Supplements Master List is Now Free!

The TrulyGlutenFree Supplements Master List of grain and dairy free supplements is now free for all to access🙂 Go get it!

AAP Advises Limit Children’s Use of Mobiles

American Academy of Paediatrics advises limiting children’s use of mobile phones. Another organisation saying it.

Acupuncture for Hot Sweats Helps 50% in 3-4 Sessions!

50% of women with hot flushes and night sweats improved after 3-4 sessions of acupuncture. Gotta be worth a try!

Free Thyroid Summit October Register Now

I don’t usually promote the zillions of summits we seem to get nowadays but actually I get asked about thyroid issues A LOT so I thought this one might actually be useful for us all as there are some really good speakers on it – Perlmutter, Fasano, Vojdani, Minich, Axe et al and some unusual angles like a guided meditation, neurofeedback, parasites, infections, LDN therapy, juicing etc. I am going to listen to it certainly.

Here’s the blurby bit on it for you – I have put in an affiliate link as I will probably buy the whole thing for us and this helps me recoup some of the costs, so thank you x

Thyroid Connection Summit

60% of those who have this…don’t know it!

Tens of millions worldwide have some form of thyroid dysfunction, and 60% don’t know they have it or how it occurred. Are you one of them? Find out! 30+ experts are here to help you diagnose and overcome thyroid dysfunction, and then reclaim your health and vitality!


Your host, Amy Myers, MD, created The Thyroid Connection Summit because conventional medicine failed her in her journey with thyroid dysfunction. It’s now her mission to help make sure it doesn’t fail you! Join us if you have Graves’, Hashimoto’s, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, cancer, nodules, cysts, I-131 radiation or are post-thyroidectomy. Or, if your doctor is says your labs are normal, yet you still have symptoms–this free, online summit is for you!

Register for FREE now here


Own all of the expert talks to watch at your own pace

The Thyroid Connection Summit will help you:

  • Work with your doctor to get the right diagnosis/treatment
  • Address the root causes of thyroid dysfunction
  • Implement healthy dietary and lifestyle changes
  • Reclaim your health and vitality
  • And more!

The Thyroid Connection Summit is online and free from October 24-31, 2016!


Recovery Bloating!

Image result for bloating One of the things you need to be prepared for when you start eating foods again is bloating! As I sit here, I am holding about 8 kittens in my stomach area.

Image result for kittensEh, kittens? P and I measure the size of my stomach in number of kittens to make it feel better!

Anyway, when you have been on a very restricted diet for several months or years and you lose a lot of weight like I did (almost 3 years on 20 foods, heading for a size 6), your body is really going to know about it when you start eating again!

You have basically been literally starving – poor macro and micro nutrient levels mean body systems slow down and you become very cold, fatigued, bony, periods stop or become erratic etc.

I began to think of it a bit akin to how anorexics must feel and suffer. And, as it turned out, my PTSD-triggered hypersensitivity was a form of eating disorder I think although I hesitate to call it that; probably more ‘disordered eating’, although I am not certain what the difference is. In fact, I overheard P telling someone how much better I was the other day and when they asked what it was, he said ‘a bit like an eating disorder’so it is clearly a kind of shorthand for what happened, an easy way to explain it, even if that wasn’t quite it as it started with a purely physiological TGF problem to gluten.

Anyway, yesterday someone liked the post I did When Will I Get Better? and I followed their blog as I often do. The top post was on recovery bloating no less and resonated with exactly how I am feeling! Have a read here:

The Truth about Bloating in Recovery

As you’ll see if you read that, the author talks about the inevitability of the body bloating when you start eating properly again. And, wisely, advises not to let it throw you back into disordered-eating thinking patterns.

I confess, a part of me has body dysmorphia – we discovered this in treatment – and this bloating has certainly made me think abut stopping eating again or at least consider cutting things out again to stop the bloat and fat feeling. This is not good! I am never going there again but it IS hard to deal with the bloating and weight gain, which happens so quickly, that it is quite normal to wobble a bit (in more ways than one!), but if we are aware it will probably happen, we can be ready for it and have a cognitive way of thinking about it ready.

For me, as a nutritionist, this is how I justify it to stop myself slipping back: ‘well, what did you think was going to happen when you reintroduced food? You needed to put weight on and you are doing. Your body doesn’t trust that it is going to get food now and has to re-learn to trust you. In the meantime, it is going to hang on to every bit of nutrient you are giving it. And when you put more food in, the gut flora is bound to change, you won’t have enough stomach acid or enzyme production to cope so OF COURSE your gut is going to struggle. Dur..!” etc etc.

That is exactly how my mind is working currently. I wanted to share it with you so you’ll be ready for it too when you start eating more foods again. Give your body – and mind – a chance to adapt and find its level. I anticipate it will take a good few months and will happen each time I put a major food group back in. And, now I can tolerate supplements again, I shall support my digestion, gut flora, vits and mins more speedily.

In essence, today’s lesson is: Bloating and weight gain will happen until the body finds its level again. Don’t let it faze you.

I need to listen to my own advice😉


When Will I Get Better?

Brain iconAh, the sixty million dollar question, isn’t it? I read an interesting post from our friends at SCD Lifestyle (the ones who do the leaky gut prog here) and the start of it made me remember something I was going to write about. Let’s begin with what they wrote:

Lately, we’ve been getting a lot of questions along the lines of: “When am I going to get better?”

I get emails like this all the time:

“Hi guys, I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease 5 years ago and I started SCD 2 weeks ago. So far my energy is better and my diarrhea’s been cut in half. My only question is: when am I going to heal? Do you think I even will be able to? Right now I can only eat 8 foods.” – Christina

I love this question. Mostly because when I was sick 7 years ago I spent endless hours trolling Google trying to find the answer myself. So I’m going to share some of the writing I’ve done about this before… because I could reply back with any number of cliché inspirational sayings we have, like:

  • “It took a long time to get sick and it takes a long time to get better”
  • “This healing process is a marathon, not a sprint – you’re doing great!”
  • “Everyone has a custom diet that works for them… you just have to keep testing until you find yours”

Each of these reassuring clichés is completely true, but what I love about Christina is: she already started the diet. She already accomplished the most difficult part of taking control of her health by overcoming thoughts in her head like “What if it doesn’t work for me?” or “I don’t have time to cook all this food.”

Starting the diet is not only the first step, but it’s the most important one. Christina is going to be just fine.

How do I know?

She cut her BM’s by 50% in two weeks.

50% Improvement Is Dramatic

Sure, she’s isn’t healed yet, but let me put 50% improvement into perspective for you.

Imagine you finished a new project at work and it was fantastic… a total home run. The following week, your boss calls you into his office and says, “You did such a good job on the last project I’m going to double your salary and give you a 200% raise.”

What would a 200% raise do for your life?

Doubling your income would be pretty awesome, right? Maybe make things a little easier…

Well, so would a natural 50% reduction in your symptoms.

How true is that?! But also how true is it that we often can’t see that improvement for what it is? I am often faced with people who have made really significant improvements in their symptoms and diet, but who can’t see it. All they can see is what they’ve still got left to do and they fail to celebrate how far they’ve come.

It reminded me of what is termed ‘catastrophising’. I did a lot of it, and catch myself still doing it. It helps me to know that, in fact, we are programmed to do it.

Whilst I was reading around for the healing series, I read a lot about the negative bias in our brain. Essentially, we are programmed to look for the danger in life – it’s what kept us safe and alive as a species! – but sometimes it can get a bit out of control.

I think it was Rick Hanson’s work that made me most aware of it. You can read his blog post series on it here:

Confronting the Negativity Bias

In some ways I was aware I was doing it, but eventually it became a habitual and very unhelpful way of thinking. I would wake up every day and my first thought was along the lines of : ‘well, I wonder what I will have to cope with today?’, ‘what symptoms will hit me that I’ll have to get through today?’ etc etc, ad infinitum. I literally steeled myself for what was going to hit. (And I do mean literally there – I became very tense, muscle-stiff, steeled, rigid if you like..) Of course, in some ways it became a self-fulfilling prophecy. You become what you think most…

Now, of course, it is totally understandable when you feel crap and in some kind of pain mentally, emotionally or physically much of the time. I’m not judging myself or you (OK, a bit myself, I admit!). But, I did find I had to become aware of it and make actual conscious efforts to turn it around; to stop it being habitual thinking, a conditioned, almost Pavlovian response. It was part of my healing process to realise what I was doing and to stop it. Easy to say, tough to do.

It is very difficult to try and see the positives in life when you feel so rubbish. I know. That’s why people tell you to write what you are grateful for every day in your journal when you go to bed and such like. It is trite as heck. But it actually works. It is part of the neuroplasticity training, if you like: changing a negative neural pathway that has developed a deep groove with overuse of the negative thinking and building a new positive pathway and repeating it over and over in various ways to strengthen it more and more. It takes time.

Part of my therapy with Julie was a complete fight as I tried to turn this catastrophising around! Oh we argued like heck sometimes. She challenged my thought processes and I defended them to the hilt, of course. We rarely came to an agreement there and then but it seemed to percolate down over the next week or so and I caught myself challenging myself – and of course chuntering about Julie who had invariably been right. Not all the time (she’s reading this and we don’t want her to get a big head ;)) but most of the time. Tsk.

Anyway, I can only tell you what I understand by catastrophising, so I asked ‘our Julie’ for her take on it for us. And she wrote us a new blog post! Have a read here:


Ok, so she spells it with a z and I spell it with an s. I had to check that, of course, pedant that I am – you can use either. Phew, thought I was going to have to change all mine!

Anyway, Julie gives some useful tips to help you notice you’re doing it and stop yourself. The bit about not assuming things will be the same every time is a good one. I remember when I started to reintroduce foods again, I was panicking I would get the same reactions as before until she said to me: ‘Why would you think you are going to react? That was before your treatment and this is afterwards. You are totally different now.’ That was very powerful. It worked and it was true and I still say it to myself all the time – building a neural pathway. Lesson learned.

Julie gets it absolutely right in her last bit:

Allow yourself to examine the evidence, searching for real facts not assumptions, and never base the future on the past! Just because something was, does not mean it will always be.

Begin to believe that, and in so doing, your brain will rewire itself and start to run a new programme in the mind and within the body; a new programme that promotes health and wellbeing.

There endeth today’s lesson; hope it helps. In essence, to answer the question we started with ‘When will I get better?’, turn it around a bit and instead ask:

How much better are you already?

Then work on the rest.

You WILL get better, believe it.